Monday, May 20, 2013

Another Mess Of Greens

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We’d bought breakfast out, since my wife’s car was in the shop for some repairs. After we ate, she beat in a little time at the mall, while I went online to do a few things. After picking up her car, we came home. We ate no lunch per se; we just sort of “pieced around,” as the old folks used to call it—a bite of this and a piece of that. I was getting a bit hungry by supper time and ate some cereal, but that didn’t quite do it.

It had been a while since I fixed my first mess of wild greens, so I went out into the yard looking for some edibles. The mix changed a bit from last time. It ran mostly plantain and violets, with a little dandelion, sheep sorrel, heal-all and sassafras leaves. I knew sassafras was edible from its use as filet in southern cooking, and from drinking the tea made from its root bark. They had enough flavor raw that I was rather sparing in adding them. As it turned out, I could have used more sassafras, since the strong flavor cooked out.

As last time, I rinsed the greens well, boiled them for 10 minutes, added butter and salt and enjoyed them. As a side dish, I finished off a piece of drying French baguette that needed eaten. It was improved with a slathering of butter and a slice of cheese. I washed it all down with a bottle of cold water. I smiled to think my supper might have been very similar to that eaten by my French peasant ancestors a millennium ago. The farthest known ancestor back on that side was supposedly named “Herbert de Forest,” or as I jokingly call him, “Herbie from the woods.” Funny, where a meal of greens can take you. © 2013
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6 comments:

Chickenmom said...

Lots of goodies in the yard if you know what to look for; there is always a snack awaiting!

Kathy Felsted Usher said...

I would like to take a course on wild foraging. I know the standards but I'm sure I'm passing up lots of good things. I petitioned my Conservation Dept to add it to their educational line up but so far they only discuss it briefly as they take nature walks. If it ever stops storming I am going to try and make dandelion syrup again but this time I will remember to put the bowl beneath the strainer so it doesn't all drain out!

Gorges Smythe said...

Well, Cm, there would be a lot more if I didn't have so much competition from the deer!

Kathy, barring a class, get a couple good books on the subject and try to find an old person who knows about foraging.

Mamahen said...

I've never had cooked sassafras leaves, although I love to munch on them right off the tree, and love the tea made fro the roots!! I think Herbie would be proud.

Mamahen said...

I've not heard of dandelion syrue... What are it's uses and how is it made if you don't mind my asking?

Gorges Smythe said...

lol! Thanks, Mh!

Mh, Kathy seems to be a nice lady, if you click on her site and ask her about the syrup, I bet she'd tell you.