Friday, August 23, 2013

A Couple Of Friday Observations

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We paid our property taxes today. For another year (actually for about another year-and-a-half since we paid them “early”), our land, home and autos are safe from being stolen by the county in which we reside. Once stolen, they would have been to be sold to the highest low-ball bidder to provide money for the county to squander and misallocate for our own “well-being” and their continued employment. That isn’t my main complaint, though. Corruption and fiscal irresponsibility are two of the things that we all hold most dear about government, after all.

No, my amazement is for the way that government offices handle their flow of customers. “Customers” is a good word, I think, since they wouldn’t have jobs without the action of separating us from our hard-earned money. Now, it’s common knowledge that most folks try their best to conduct their business with the government during their lunch break, if possible. That’s because, in its infinite wisdom, the government always keeps the same hours that other businesses do. SO, if you have to get a driver’s license, pay your taxes, or take care of any such business, you have to do so during hours when your boss fully expects you to be on the job making money for HIM. He isn’t usually concerned with your petty problems, like holding onto the roof over your head. Obviously, neither is the government, or they’d keep different hours.

Now businesses like restaurants, who KNOW in advance that they will have a rush of customers that will show up between 11 o’clock and two o’clock, make sure that they have extra employees on hand to cover that rush. So what do government offices do to deal with that same type of customer influx? Simple, they either close their office completely, OR leave behind a couple of the slowest, least experienced workers to deal with the long lines of understandably impatient people who want to do business during their lunch break. Problem solved!

The other thing that amazed me today was an article in one of the country’s “big two” hunting and fishing magazines. Now, being a former archer, I slowed down my customary pre-trash 20 minute scan of the normally irrelevant magazine to check out an article comparing bows that are currently available. The first thing I noticed was that every “bow” looked like some gothic torture device. I remember when words like “symmetry” and “flowing lines” were used to describe bows. Of course, dinosaurs still roamed the earth at the time. Frankly, the devices that I saw that were called bows would have given me nightmares. I’d be afraid they’d morph into some other life form when I was alone in the woods with them and that I would forever remain “missing in action” to my friends and family.

The other thing that I noticed was that the prices STARTED at $799 and went up to $999. Now I’m all for separating the proverbial fool from his money, but there comes a time when a company can be as corrupt as a government agency. Apparently, the selling of arrow-launching machines is one of those times. The other thing that amazed me is just how HUGE a fool some folks must be. For thousands of years, “primitive” peoples have fed their families with two sticks and a string; the “bow” companies had better hope that no-one remembers that fact! © 2013
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11 comments:

Sunnybrook Farm said...

I saw some new bows on TV the other day, I didn't realize what they were at first. I used to shoot either a long bow or recurve most of the time. Even made my own stone arrow points. The wood just felt good in my hand.

Sixbears said...

I must admit, my town offices and even the DOT are good to deal with here.

Ran into a guy who moved from NJ, and he was in heaven to deal with friendly people who knew there stuff and there wasn't even a line.

Now all I have to do is to catch up with the rest of my taxes. . .

Gorges Smythe said...

I used to shoot recurves, SF; if I ever get back into archery, it will probably be with a home-made longbow.

It's nice your town is like that, Sixbears, probably it's because it's still a SMALL town.

c w swanson said...

We are no longer a people that has a government, but more accurately a government that has a people. We traded a king who let us own land at his sufferance, for a democracy that lets us own land at it's sufferance.

Hhmmmppff!

Gorges Smythe said...

That's about the size of it, CW!

Pumice said...

Last time I went to renew my driver's license they made me go see an eye doctor that I had just been to because for some reason the eye problem I have had all my life was not in the computer. That meant two days off for the DMV and an extra doctor visit that was not covered by any kind of insurance.

I feel your pain.

Grace and peace.

jambaloney said...

i agree with you on the bows - i took a great course back in ottawa and we were trained on re-curves, so i bought a ben pearson cougar off e-bay as my own bow - nice old recurve and only 70 dollars!

modern compound bows are a mess of wires and struts - they are apparently easier to shoot at hunting draw weights BUT...

fat chance fixing it yourself and yep, they cost as much as a boat!

i would LOVE to see you make a homemade longbow... what wood would you use?

cheers!

Gorges Smythe said...

Ya gotta love bureaucracy, Pumice!

I've shot a couple wheel-bows, but it sort of felt like I was shooting with a car door. I've got a lot of hickory on my place, jambaloney, so I'd probably go with that.

21shergar said...

Reduced staffing at lunchtime leading to queues is a problem here in the UK, too.

Kathy Felsted Usher said...

I now go to the DMV right after I get off work when people are traveling home, rarely a line. I used to go at lunch too and you would think they would stagger their lunch times better but they don't.

Gorges Smythe said...

I think they forget who is supposed to be serving who, Kathy.