Saturday, August 2, 2014

Five Days On The Job


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So far, so good, as they say. I’ve got a lot of things to learn and have made a couple minor gaffs already, but nothing they wouldn’t expect from a new guy on the job. The owners and their staff give very appearance as being as nice to work for, and work with, as I suspected that they would be. One thing I like about the owners is that they grew up in the business and still do most every aspect of the job on a daily business. It’s a whole lot easier to respect and follow orders from people who actually know what they’re talking about than it is from some guy in a suit, sitting in an office with no idea what’s going on anywhere except on paper.

I love the work—traveling from slag yard to work site to supply yard, to sand-pit, etc. There isn’t much sitting still, since keeping the truck moving is what makes the owner money. I enjoy the change of scenery, going to and arriving at the different places that I go; I even find the sand pits interesting. I thought that I knew where most of the sand pits and slag yards in the area were located. The truth is that I only knew about the tip of the iceberg, so to speak. I haven’t seen “nothin” yet, I’m sure. I learned there is an underground LIMESTONE mine on the eastern county line at a place called SAND HILL. (As far as I know, there’s never been a sandstone mine at Limestone Hill on the southern edge of the county. LOL!) It’s quite a surprise to start down into their yard of several acres from the hilltop. It’s a view slightly reminiscent of the big copper mines out west, but on a much smaller scale.

Every job has its downside, of course. One of them on this job is traveling the far-flung country roads to make deliveries to oilfield sites. I’ve only made two of those deliveries so far, but speeding down roads already torn up by oilfield equipment feels akin to sitting on the handlebars of a jack-hammer in use. After two trips, I had both a b_tt-ache and a headache. I don’t care for long rides of over an hour on the interstate, either, and for related reasons. At least there, though, I can set the cruise and move my legs a little. I like the short hauls, where you make shorter, but more frequent deliveries. They let me get out of the truck and stretch my legs more often.

Besides the fact that the folks are good to work for, there’s another plus. I picked up my first paycheck from my new job yesterday (they DO NOT hold back a week, like most places), and my last paycheck from my former employer. Even though the one from my old job was the largest I’d ever gotten (for some unknown reason), the one from my new employers was for $45 more, and for only four days, not five like the first place (though the total hours were nearly the same). Their pay period is from Friday through Thursday, so yesterday’s pay will be on next week’s check. I’m still $3 short per hour of what I was making when the factory moved to China nine years ago, but the overtime will probably more than make up the difference. That overtime is the cost of not getting laid-off in the winter, since the owners try to not hire more people than they can use in the winter. While I might not enjoy the overtime, I’ll enjoy the extra money and the lessened chance of winter-time lay-off when expenses are the highest.

Since I follow the old maxim to write about what you know about, future posts may contain more references to my job than some folks will care for, but I hope you’ll bear with me. Also, thanks again to everyone who has been praying for my employment situation. Your prayers and mine have been answered to the affirmative. “Praise God from whom all blessings flow!” © 2014
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11 comments:

Vicki said...

I am so glad for you, especially that you have a job that you like. Makes a big difference.

Brian said...

I'm glad the job is working out, happy days go in quickly.. Fed up unhappy days drag.. So enjoy the job Sir!!!

Sunnybrook Farm said...

Good, it sounded like it would be a neat job to me. Maybe they will put a snow plow on the front for winter!

Sixbears said...

I'm glad it's mostly good. No job is perfect. The fact that they are planning for the winter slow down is a good sign. Shows loyalty and respect to their workers.

Bean counters would overhire in the summer to prevent overtime and lay them off in the winter.

Scooney Adrift said...

Sounds good so far. Nothing like having a paycheck. Now you can take the Misses out for a nice meal. Keep the stories coming!

Chickenmom said...

Glad you like the job, Gorges! May I suggest getting a nice cushion to sit on? One that is covered in cloth.
Hubby was a machinist for 40 years until his company moved down South. Then he drove a school bus for 10 years before we moved. He loved his little "butt cushion"! He said it
saved his arse!

Ralph Goff said...

Sounds great Gorges. Beats sitting behind a desk I am sure. And yes, write about what you do. Maybe a picture of the work site and machinery?

Angela said...

I'm so glad to hear that you are enjoying your new job! Praise God for new opportunities! Hopefully this Winter will be a mild one so it won't be as hard on you for your job.

Gorges Smythe said...

Thanks from the bottom of my heart, everyone! What more can I say?

Carl Belken said...

I'm glad your new job is working out well for you. I spent most of my life working under people who had no clue. For a brief period of time I worked at a second job. I liked my second job far better. I knew the man who owned the company and everyone underneath him worked their way up from the bottom. I actually felt like I was part of a family at that job.

I hope things continue to go well for you!

Gorges Smythe said...

Thanks, CB, I appreciate it!