Sunday, May 24, 2015

Waste (w/pic)

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I hauled some “dirt” (contaminated sawdust) to the dump a couple weeks ago for about a week, at five trips a day. Once again, I was amazed by the things that I saw going there. The construction and demolition debris going there continues to be downright sinful. Having come from a sawmill family, I cringe every time that I see absolutely UNUSED material going to the dump to be covered over with filth and wasted. Some landfills refuse to accept yard waste and lumber, insisting that they be recycled or composted. I wish ours was that way. It wouldn’t put the contractors in such a bind, either, if everyone had to live by the same rules.

This past week, I worked for another company that our employers had farmed some of us out to. Once again, nearly perfect farmland is being used to enlarge an industrial park, while a swamp (aka “valuable wetland) sits unused next door. On the job where I was hauling, there were TWO state inspectors sitting in their cars, not really communicating with each other, making me think they were from different agencies. Neither one seemed to be serving much purpose, other than to slow the work down occasionally. The one was so young that I was surprised his mother let him out of the house, so I couldn’t help but wonder if us taxpayers were getting our money’s worth.

A little piece down the road, the renting farmer got the field plowed and disked before the owners came in and drove survey stakes all over the place and put up little plastic erosion barriers. I don’t know what’s going in there. In front of another industrial property, a bunch of maple trees are being cut, with no indication that it’s for any reason other than to have a more manicured front lawn. The entire trees are being chipped, logs and branches alike. Next door, a two foot thick walnut tree was cut into firewood because it was too close to power lines. I don’t blame them, but they could have sawed that tree into at least $500 worth of beautiful lumber, rather than $50 worth of firewood.


I found out, this week, that an old stone school building, probably from WPA days, was being demolished. It was one of the few remaining stone structures in town, and was solid as a rock, so I guess it just HAD to go. This area seems to have no appreciation either for quality structures, or history. It would have made a good apartment building or something, but I guess the land is freed up for “development” now. No wonder we have nothing in this area, we keep destroying what we DO have.

The Roosevelt School, Parkersburg, WV, stands no longer.
(Photo from online source.)

© 2015
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8 comments:

Vicki said...

It's called "Progress," Gorges. And for the most part, I hate it. Time was, things were built to last, like that beautiful stone building. Now...not so much.

Brian said...

Such a shame to waste good timber..
And the old buildings..
Over on my side of the world most old structures are saved even badly crumbling ones..
Maybe folks should be getting together to save the old and make it into something new...;b

Chickenmom said...

So sad. That beautiful building could have been turned into senior citizen apartments. I hope they find a good use for all that stone - it would be a sin to waste it.

Lady Locust said...

Grrr... they will probably replace it with something disposable. They did that to our 100+ year old hospital last fall. It's now just an empty lot. Word was the hospital in it's new building didn't want any competition so had the old one torn down.

Wade Herod said...

That picture looks like the elementary I went to. Built at the turn of last century. It had hardwood floors, steam heat, 12' ceilings (didn't need A/C) and a clay school yard. Played a lot of marbles and baseball in that yard.

Of course they tore it down for some state building.

I miss it and I don't even live there anymore.

Wade in NW Florida

Sixbears said...

That kind of waste drives me nuts. They don't let people people pick at the local dumps (I mean "transfer stantions") anymore. Share really, as so much just ends up in the landfill.

Ralph Goff said...

That kind of waste drives me crazy too Gorges. I guess if I lived near a dump like that I"d never have to buy another piece of lumber.

Gorges Smythe said...

You're right about not being built to last, Vicki. It started years ago, too. I went to a grade school in town the first year that it was open, and I could literally look up to the corner of the ceiling and see the sky. Now, they want to tear it down and build a new one, though they profess they never have the money to maintain the exesting ones.

I wish it was the same here, Brian.

I'm sure the stone went to the landfill, Cm; it's the Parkersburg way!

That's the way it works, LL.

I'm sure what they replaced it with is of inferior materials, WH.

Yeah, that's for "sanitation" reasons, Six Bears. NOT!

You'd have to guard the entrance, Ralph, 'cause they won't let you salvage anymore.