Friday, September 23, 2022

Good For Davy!

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The poor occupants in the Western District in Tennessee in 1829 were settlers, who with their families had moved in from east to settle on virgin country, where no white man had ever lived before. The country here was a complete wilderness full of cane and woods between the river forks. It was a hard work for the occupant family to clear some acres, to have some fields made, and to build a little cabin from the timber.
Often when the occupant had lived a short time on their little tract of land, a landspecular passed by and told them that they had to buy the land from him, because he was owner of the land or represented a owner, who had title deed. The occupants, who had no money, had no chance to buy, and they soon had to leave their home and improvements. They then started as occupants again on a new place further west.
David Crockett, who lived among the occupants in the Western District (present West Tennessee) in 1829 and knew them very well, wanted with his proposal in the Congress (read previous post 09) to give the occupant up to 160 acres for their work; for the cabin and improvements, so they were able to stay on the land.

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