Saturday, December 3, 2016

A Farm Boy “Thermos”

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When I was a kid, we didn’t lack for anything, but there wasn’t money to throw away, either. Dad had a typical domed lunch box that he’d purchased in years past, and I had an old hand-me-down one that had been painted green at some point. It worked as good as any other. I suspect that an insulated bottle once fit in the top of Dad’s box, but they were glass-lined then, and I figure that it had been dropped at some point, because I don’t remember ever seeing it. What we BOTH had was a low-budget way to semi-insulate a quart jar of iced tea to go with our lunches.

Back then, no-one had yet dreamed of plastic shopping bags, so paper bags were used and saved by nearly everyone. Of course they came in various sizes, some of which were just the right size to envelope a quart canning jar and let you roll the top to “seal” the paper container. So, when Mom packed our lunches to take on “the ridge” three miles from our home to work at our sawmill, we took our fancy drink jars with us.

One bag wouldn’t have had much insulation value so the system usually started with at least three. As sweat from the icy drink jar softened the bags and they gradually went to pieces over the course of a week or more of use, another bag would be added as needed. Sometimes, a five pound sugar or flour bag would be used as part of the system, as they held up pretty well. I’m sure that, since the worst damage to the bags was on the bottom, a piece of round cardboard inside the inner bag would have done much to lengthen the life of the bags, but we never thought of that. This paper package was then placed inside a one gallon paint can, thus giving the unit a hard, unbreakable bottom and sides, and providing a handle (the bail).

We’d take our lunch break when Paul Harvey was on (12:30, I think). We’d pull the truck over close to the skidway, turn on the radio loud enough to hear a few feet from the truck while the door was open, then sit on a skid and eat our lunch. Often, we had cold hamburger sandwiches with pickles (mine sweet, Dad’s dill). Sometimes I had bologna and cheese and Dad had pickle loaf or pimento loaf. When we pulled out the ice tea, there would always be some ice still floating at the top of the jar. A couple upside down shakes and the weak tea on top (from the melted ice) would be blended with the stronger tea in the bottom and we’d wash down our sandwiches, and whatever we’d have for dessert, with our favorite drink.

Incidentally, those little gallon buckets were handy things to have. We used them for nail buckets when we were either building or dismantling something. They could be used for egg baskets, waste cans in the truck, picking berries, or even holding paint! Containers are one thing that EVERY homesteader or farmer will always have a use for. I want a clean gallon bucket to use for dipping saw chains in naphtha to degrease them, so I called the paint store today. I leaned that I can buy new, unused ones for $4.07. I may get more than one, since they’re so handy to have around. © 2016
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"All Things Old Are New Again"

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A nice little girl that my wife sometimes talks to at Chinamart told her the other day that she had something neat to show her."Something new and really pretty," she said. When she showed my wife some bubble lights, my wife chuckled before she could catch herself. She told the girl that they are sort of rare these days, but that they had them when SHE was a little kid, and that was many decades ago. The girl was surprised, and maybe a bit embarrassed, but she took it well. On the way home, we agreed that we were glad that the little clerk had discovered bubble lights; they ARE neat.

When I got home, I looked them up online and Wiki said they were first made in England in the late 1920's, but production didn't start in this country until 1946. We had them when I was a kid, and my wife's family did, too. We don't put any on our tree, but the missus has a little bubble light display in our two front windows. I swear, I think I could sit and watch them almost like a flickering campfire or a lava light. Remember THOSE? © 2016
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Another War Memory

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I used to call my dad’s generation “the golden generation,” because I believe that they represented America at the best we ever were and will ever be. Most folks back then were honorable people and I consider my father to have been one of the best. Folks today probably wouldn’t believe that many, if not MOST young couples were virgins when they married, but I believe they were.

However, in every generation, there are also a few folks that are unwise and get the cart before the horse. There have always been a few unwed mothers and men who were nothing but alley cats. It was no different with my father’s generation. He saw the worst of it, though, when he was in the service.

Once the war was over and most of the troops were stationed nearer the larger cities in the Philippines and Japan, there was no shortage of madams and mamasans with a few “girls” for hire on a short term basis. Dad told me that you could walk down the street and see GI’s lined up 20 deep, waiting their “turn.” Also, some parents thought nothing of setting up shop in their own home and pimping their daughters. They would stand outside and take the money, while the men went inside with their daughters. What amazed Dad was that most of them were married men. Their excuse was that when you become accustomed to certain things, it was rough doing without it. He said a few of the single guys frequented such places, but they were a minority. What amazed me was that anyone would want to be number two, let alone number 20.

Not surprisingly, disease was rampant among the “girls” and their customers. That’s why the service men had to line up every month and get their penicillin shot. Back then, that pretty much took care of known venereal diseases, unlike today. Most of the guys didn’t need it, but since the guilty parties would never seek help on their own, or even admit their indiscretions, it was easier to just give them ALL a shot.

Of course they also had booze-hounds who’d hit every bar when they could, and gamblers who would throw away all of their money and half of their buddies on “good hands.” While most of the farm boys and working-class single guys were sending money home to their families, a lot of the rounders, gamblers and drinkers would write home to their folks asking for them to send money. I reckon it was mostly in how they were raised. © 2016
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Friday, December 2, 2016

Prayers Please!

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I have friend whose husband has a gambling problem. Obviously, I can't tell you who it is, but the Lord knows. Please pray that the problem is resolved. Thank you.
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Thank You, Blogger! (seriously)

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Usually, anytime Blogger changes anything, it's for the worse in my book. I suppose some new mid-level manager needs to convince the company that there's some reason to pay him a salary, so he has to change something. Chances are, he's never blogged himself, so has no idea the effect it may have on those who do.

They surprised me this time, though. For several years, Blogger has provided me no way to unfollow any blogger who used WordPress, or who removed his blog, even though it was still on my list. I know that several of you told me how to do it, but it really WOULD NOT WORK from my computer. I just blamed it on my computer using XP and the newer systems not jiving with it. Well, the new system they're using makes it very easy to delete unwanted blogs from my list, so thank you, Blogger.

I dropped anyone who hadn't posted for over a year. Some hadn't posted for FOUR years, which means that it had been THREE years since I'd had the ability to quit following blogs, if I so chose. Some blogs had been taken down, while others had taken different directions that didn't interest me. Quite a few blogs that were taken down or hadn't been tended for years, were folks that were very supportive when I first started this project seven years ago. I missed their company, but had no way to contact them. I'm sure that several of them have passed away, but I would have no way of knowing. One or two still comment on my blog on rare occasions, but still have no blog, or an inactive blog. I hope those folks know how much I miss reading their own contribution to the blogosphere, and how much I appreciate that they still follow me.

My list is probably about half as long as it was earlier this evening, and that is both a good and a sad thing. Life moves on though, and so must we. Thanks to everyone who reads my blather; your loyalty is much appreciated.
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Uses For Vicks

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Click image to enlarge.
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A Request

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Please consider sending this gentleman a birthday card.

Click image to enlarge.
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I've Got A Problem (No sarcastic remarks, please.) ;-)

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I just began following a new blog and now all the comments on that blog are showing up in my reading list. Does anyone know how to put a stop to the problem?
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My Car is the Grinch (a link)

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These poor folks have had a bad two months. I hope you'll pray for them. Thanks.

Kentucky Hollers: My Car is the Grinch
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Lies, Damn Lies And Statistics

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If you don't like my title, blame Mark Twain! - lol - I just heard a liberal on TV saying how Obama has gotten the unemployment rate down to 4.6%, and he just didn't know how it could GO much lower than that. First, there's always ZERO. Second, Obama's minions are lying through their teeth, the REAL rate is about 9.3%, though SOME sources say it's as high as 40%.
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Now It's Kellogg's And Soros (a link)

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http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/02/kellogg-foundation-gave-big-to-soros-organization-tides-foundation/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social
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Whine, Whine, Whine

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Some talking heads were on TV this morning whining about the fact that the American people expect them to quit lying and tell the truth. I wonder if they have coloring books, too.
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A Question

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I notice that I don't get much comment on my tool pieces. That's not surprising since most of you are either older, country or both. Would you rather not be bothered with such articles? Just curious, as I'd probably still write them for the city-slickers on Facebook.
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Viva la Electoral College (a link)

- Medley of Worship: Opus 2016-319: Cornerstone Considerations: Viva la Electoral College -

The Camp Pirate (a link)

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https://filthiestbox.blogspot.com/2016/12/filthies-hinterlands-whos-who-camp.html?showComment=1480694013209#c1093547222178290029
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How Crazy Is Crazy Enough? (a link)

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Coffee with the Hermit: How Crazy Is Crazy Enough...?
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Thursday, December 1, 2016

Dead Skin On Your Feet? Try This!

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Now that I'm old, fat and stiff, I tend to ignore my feet. They're difficult enough to get to that don't get the attention they did when I was younger and on them all day. Either as a result of that, or maybe some exotic hoof disease, I had a substantial build-up of dead skin on the tops and sides of my toes and just behind them, on my lower instep. On a hunch, I slathered them with Vicks VapoRub, put on a clean pair of socks and went to bed. Next day, I left the socks on and didn't take them off until after supper.

Scratching the area with my fingernails, the dead skin rolled off in gobs. It was sort of gross, but I knew fingernails were probably the safest tool to use, so I kept after it until all the dead skin was completely gone. There was some mild pain, because I was scraping tender skin that had previously been protected by a layer of hard dead skin, but the skin remaining looked healthy. Needless to say, I gave my fingers and nails a really good going-over with soap and a fingernail brush.

My ankles and upper instep seem to be okay, I must reach them well enough with the wash cloth. Around the back of my heels is a different story, though. Maybe I'll try them next. If you have a similar problem, and the stomach to put up with scads of dead skin temporarily under your nails, give it a try.
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Immortal Quotes: “A Different Drummer”, part 2 of 2, The Step (a link)

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Medley of Worship: Opus 2016-318: Immortal Quotes: “A Different Drummer”, part 2 of 2, The Step
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Immortal Quotes: “A Different Drummer”, part 1 of 2, The Beat (a link)

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Medley of Worship: Opus 2016-317: Immortal Quotes: “A Different Drummer”, part 1 of 2, The Beat
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Still Tilting At Windmills

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When I blocked another stupid advertisement, Facebook asked me what was wrong. This was my reply: "You have utterly no idea what interests me, or why, but I know that you just don't have it in you to leave me alone. Maybe you should get rid of all that fake news in the right-hand column. THAT would be nice!"
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Ever The Nay-Sayer - Obama Saying Trump Can't Do It (a link)

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http://www.hannity.com/articles/hanpr-election-493995/watch-obama-mocked-trump-for-saying-15350028/
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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Why The Electoral College?

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There are 3,141 counties in the United States.
Trump won 3,084 of them.
Clinton won 57.
There are 62 counties in New York State.
Trump won 46 of them.
Clinton won 16.
Clinton won the popular vote by approx. 1.5 million votes.
In the 5 counties that encompass NYC, (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Richmond & Queens) Clinton received well over 2 million more votes than Trump. (Clinton only won 4 of these counties; Trump won Richmond)
Therefore these 5 counties alone, more than accounted for Clinton winning the popular vote of the entire country.
These 5 counties comprise 319 square miles.
The United States is comprised of 3, 797,000 square miles.
When you have a country that encompasses almost 4 million square miles of territory, it would be ludicrous to even suggest that the vote of those who inhabit a mere 319 square miles should dictate the outcome of a national election.
Large, densely populated Democrat cities (NYC, Chicago, LA, etc) don’t and shouldn’t speak for the rest of our country.
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Just when I Thought They Couldn't Slither Any Lower (a link)

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http://www.mrctv.org/blog/some-liberals-say-gatlinburg-fire-punishment-trump-support
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The War On Cash

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Posted by Charlie Tango on Facebook
War on cash

It’s happening faster than we could have ever imagined.
Every time we turn around, it seems, there’s another major assault in the War on Cash.
India is the most notable recent example-- the embarrassing debacle a few weeks ago in which the government, overnight, “demonetized” its two largest denominations of cash, leaving an entire nation in chaos.
But there have been so many smaller examples.
In the US city of New Orleans, the local government decided earlier this month to stop accepting cash payments from drivers at the Office of Motor Vehicles.
As I wrote to you recently, several branches of Citibank in Australia have stopped dealing in cash altogether.
And former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers published an article last week stating that “nothing in the Indian experience gives us pause in recommending that no more large notes be created in the United States, Europe, and around the world.”
In other words, despite the India chaos, Summers thinks we should still curtail the $100 bill.
The conclave of the high priests of monetary policy almost invariably sings the same chorus: only criminals and terrorists use high denominations of cash.
Ken Rogoff, Harvard professor and former official at the International Monetary Fund and Federal Reserve, recently published a book blatantly entitled The Curse of Cash.
Ben Bernanke’s called it a “fascinating and important book”.
And, shockingly, a number of reviews on Amazon praise “brilliant” Rogoff’s “visionary concepts” in his “excellent book”.
Rogoff, like most of his colleagues, contends that large bills like the $100 or 500 euro note are only used in “drug trade, extortion, bribes, human trafficking. . .”
In fact they jokingly refer to the 500-euro note as the “Bin Laden” since it’s apparently only used by terrorists.
Give me a break.
My team and I did some of research on this and found some rather interesting data.
It turns out that countries with higher denominations of cash actually have much lower crime rates, including rates of organized crime.
The research was simple; we looked at the World Economic Forum’s competitive rankings that assesses countries’ levels of organized crime, as well as the direct business costs of dealing with crime and violence.
Switzerland, with its 1,000 Swiss franc note (roughly $1,000 USD) has among the lowest levels of organized crime in the world according to the WEF.
Ditto for Singapore, which has a 1,000 Singapore dollar note (about $700 USD).
Japan’s highest denomination of currency is 10,000 yen, worth $88 today. Yet Japan also has extremely low crime rates.
Same for the United Arab Emirates, whose highest denomination is the 1,000 dirham ($272).
If you examine countries with very low denominations of cash, the opposite holds true: crime rates, and in particular organized crime rates, are extremely high.
Consider Venezuela, Nigeria, Brazil, South Africa, etc. Organized crime is prevalent. Yet each of these has a currency whose maximum denomination is less than $30.
The same trend holds true when looking at corruption and tax evasion.
Yesterday we wrote to you about Georgia, a small country on the Black Sea whose flat tax prompted tax compliance (and tax revenue) to soar.
It’s considered one of the most efficient places to do business with very low levels of corruption.
And yet the highest denomination note in Georgia is the 500 lari bill, worth about $200. That’s a lot of money in a country where the average wage is a few hundred dollars per month.
Compare that to Malaysia or Uzbekistan, two countries where corruption abounds.
Malaysia’s top cash note is 50 ringgit, worth about $11. And Uzbekistan’s 5,000 som is worth a paltry $1.57.
Bottom line, the political and financial establishments want you to willingly get on board with the idea of abolishing, or at least reducing, cash.
And they’re pumping out all sorts of propaganda to do it, trying to get people to equate crime and corruption with high denominations of cash.
Simply put, the data doesn’t support their assertion. It’s just another hoax that will give them more power at the expense of your privacy and freedom.
Until tomorrow,
Simon Black
Founder, SovereignMan.com
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Da Prez Was On Da TV Whinin'

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Poor wil Bewwy Obamy, evewy network in the country ith on hith thide, except FOX Newth, and ith all the THEIR fault that the dumbocwath wotht!
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Some Things Never Change

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The media has been so busy nit-picking Trump and making excuses for the muslim scumbag at OSU, that they are just beginning to become aware that there have been super destructive wildfires in Tennessee (and elsewhere).
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Notes On Rehafting Tools (replacing handles) (w/pic)

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Click image to enlarge.

If you have a hammer or axe handle with a broken-off handle in it, the first thing you need to do is get the remainder of the old handle out. I normally do that by letting any handle stub hang between the jaws of my heaviest vice, so it just barely has room to move. Then I drive the old handle out using an old bolt and a heavy hammer. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE do not follow the advice that I’ve read a time or two and throw the head in a campfire to burn the handle out. That removes the temper and RUINS the tool, unless you’re an expert at retempering.

No doubt, there are better ways to get a handle (haft) in place, but after driving a handle in an axe or hammer head until it’s very tight, I simply use a half-round file to make a very slight groove around the handle, right against the head; then I drive the handle in a bit further. I keep repeating this until the handle extends beyond the tool head the desired distance (1/8” to 1/2”) and then wedge it in place. On picks and such, you pretty much have to drive in the handle (you can do this by thumping it on the ground, or floor), then take the handle back out. Look for marks where the head is tight on the handle and rasp those places down a little. Then you keep repeating the process until the head is where you want it on the handle. You then cut the extension off ¾” or more beyond the handle. (I left about 1-1/4” on my last one) Finish by rasping the edges smooth, so they’ll be less likely to splinter from being thumped around.

I must confess that I’ve only made a handful of handles in my life. I found that I could buy handles cheaply enough that it never paid me to take the time. (That may be changing, now that I’m a poverty-stricken retiree.) Of course, since handles are now made from sawn lumber, rather than split blanks, you really have to inspect the grain carefully before you buy. The least bit of run-out in the grain may cause breakage in the future, especially if the cross-grain is in the half of the handle towards the head. I prefer the grain to run from front to back in the handle, though I HAVE read of folks who prefer side to side. The only problem with front to back grain is that the handle may bow, if left out in the weather. The solution to THAT problem should be obvious.

On those tools where the handle is inserted from the top, like adzes, picks, mattocks, eye hoes, tomahawks, etc., the extension is left above the head to allow for wear and wood shrinkage. If the handle is 100% dry, it may not shrink. However, if you keep the tool for years and use it a lot, there will be some wear, since it isn’t wedged in place, but is only a friction fit. If you were to be using a pick or mattock for old-fashioned excavating, where you would be working a vertical face higher than the blade is long, you may not be able to leave as quite as much handle extended beyond the head, as it may hit the “wall” of the hole. If you’re only working blade deep, as in a flower bed, you could probably get by with more.

A lot of old picks and mattocks that I’ve seen have the protruding handle worn into a dome shape, rather than the straight cut as it began. This is usually from hitting the wall, but is also caused by storing the tool by standing it on dirt or concrete. That allows moisture to wick into the handle and rot off a bit at a time. The same thing can happen with axes and sledge hammers and such. I’ve seen tools where the handle was sound, but the wood in the eye of the tool was too rotten to allow the tool to be used. To prevent that problem, either hang the tool up when not in use, or put a brick or something under the end of the head so the handle stub won’t come in contact with the ground or concrete. It’s best to put something water-proof, like a piece of asphalt shingle atop the brick, too. Naturally, if you store the tool in a building with an above ground wooden floor, there is no concern at all. Incidentally, I’ve seen some really old tools that had shims of tin, rawhide, or leather in the eye to make an otherwise worn-out handle serve a while longer.

On tools that have a handle that fits in the head from the bottom (axes, hammers, etc.), little extension is needed. Since the eyes of those tools normally have a double taper, they are wedged in place. When installing the handle, I’ve learned to take a file and chamfer the top of the wedge slot a little, which makes it easier to start the wedge, once the handle is driven in place. After the wooden wedge is firmly in place, I trim the stub to the desired length. If there’s a gap front to back in the eye, use the little metal wedges made for that purpose and drive them in cross-wise of the wooden wedge. They can usually be placed near the center in a hammer handle. On an axe handle, I use two if any are needed, and place one about an inch from each narrow edge of the handle. If the handle shrinks a little more with time, just drive the handle in deeper and drive the wedge(s) in further.

This article doesn’t cover everything, of course, but if you have any questions, I’ll answer them if I can. © 2016
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Real Vs. On Paper - Fredd Nails It Again (a link)

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http://freddsez.blogspot.com/2016/11/trumps-real-world-vs-obamas-on-paper.html
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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

A Mish-Mash Of Mush-Mosh

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I haven’t got much done this past week, between my cold and the weather. Two days, I did absolutely nothing. I have managed to get a little wood drug up by my wood pile and throw some smaller limbs down by the brush heap, plus trim a couple poles on which I’ll stack small piles of wood (about 1/5 of a face cord). Next year, I may try selling some bundles, as they would bring more money per cord than selling “bulk.” I cleaned some tools out of the back of my truck, in preparation for putting a couple other things in for winter driving. I also whacked the extra length from my mattock handle. I may do a picture and a few comments on the subject later this week. Incidentally, feel free to follow me on Facebook, too. I repost links on religion, politics, homesteading, gardening, survival, prepping and anything else that strikes my fancy. Look for MY name, though, not the blog name.

I found some unopened multi-symptom cough syrup under my bathroom counter which came in handy for a couple days. I had to back off on it, though, as it was making my sinuses TOO dry and seemed to be affecting my sense of smell. My wife’s cooking smelled like she was using a mix of stale olive oil and paraffin to cook with and it nearly made me sick every time she cooked. She just switched to Chinamart butter from the good stuff, though, so it might be that. Then again, I guess I could be pregnant.

Finally, my doc’s office called back yesterday (the 28th), after leaving a message on the 18th for me to call them on the 21st. I called them then, and on the 22nd, and yesterday. It turns out that now that the staff is back to doing their job, the doc is off all week. I’m planning on being in his office when he comes in Tuesday and waiting to see him, even if I have to camp there a couple days. I’m hoping to get some hormone replacement for what my meds (or my age and weight) have killed off so I can resolve a certain problem that I’ve discussed here before. The nurse told me, though, that Medicaid won’t usually cover that sort of thing, and it costs $150 a month if you buy it yourself. Maybe I’ll just get a sex change; Obama would probably pay for it!

It’s supposed to rain here tomorrow, but I’d gladly give it to Tennessee and Israel if I could. Terrorists set the fires in Israel, and they plan on doing the same here, I’ve read. Who knows, some of the ones down south may have been started by ragheads. I’ve said all along that it’s time that we go back to shooting looters and vandals on sight; maybe it’s time we do the same with arsonists, especially if they think that they’ll be rewarded with 72 perpetual virgins. We’d be doing them a favor; don’t you think?

They keep showing the picture and giving the name of the campus cop that killed the latest terrorist at OSU. I guess they want to set him up to be murdered in revenge by another raghead. People have no sense. Of course, what can we expect from folks who probably voted for Killary?

Well, that’s probably as much of my blather and diatribes as you can handle for today; I hope you recover if it was too much. I WILL ask you to pray for the folks where the wildfires are burning, both here and in Israel. May God bless the ones who do so. © 2016
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The Foolishness Never Ends

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Facebook just blocked me temporarily for "going too fast." How stupid can you get? If any of my "friends" think that I post too much or too often, all they have to do is unfollow or unfriend me. Why does Facebook think they have to interfere? If I had to pay for the service, I wouldn't.
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A Story We'll Never Hear On MSM

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Lost in all the chaos at Ohio State University today was something that most people probably missed. About an hour into it, when everyone was "sheltering in place" all over campus, CNN took a phone call from a young woman who was locked inside a classroom right near where the suspect was hurting people. She said she was a graduate student and she and many others were huddled together scared and not sure what was happening outside. Then she said something made me tear up.

She said casually to the TV anchor over the phone, "But we happened to have a few 'military guys' in my class and the minute we got the text message alert of an 'active shooter on campus' they moved the rest of us away from the door and then all of them stood guard right by the door." She said they were standing there as she spoke making certain if a shooter or someone with a knife or whatever calamity tried to come through that door, they would be the first thing he'd see and they'd stop it and protect the other students or die trying.


These guys weren't armed, I'm guessing they weren't in uniform, they were just students who happened to have military training. Those "military guys" instantly put themselves on the clock and assumed the position to protect those unarmed, vulnerable students. 


I thought that was impressive. I thought that was brave. I thought that was oh so very American. I also thought you'd want to know.


John Grey, writer and journalist
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Won't Hurt A Friend For Food (a link (that you should read))

- Coffee with the Hermit: Won't Hurt A Friend For Food...! -

Monday, November 28, 2016

Quote of the Day (a link)

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Stranger Things Have Happened: Quote of the Day
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Yeah, RIGHT!

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The scumbag at OSU has a thoroughly muslim name. THE POLICE ARE NOW TRYING TO DETERMINE HIS MOTIVE.
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But Who Will You Rob To Get More Millions? (meme)

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Click image to enlarge.

So that means she wants to kill off 6.5 billion people, or 93% of the existing world population. I wonder just who she thinks is going to do the work to support these elite that she wants to survive?
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Can You Say "Weyerhauesr" And "Georgia-Pacific?" (meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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Fear (meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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A VERY Select Group Of Friends (meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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Hello, Cuba? (meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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WHY I VOTED DEMOCRAT by JAMES W. ANDERSON

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1. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I LOVE THE FACT THAT I CAN NOW MARRY WHATEVER I WANT. I NOW MAY MARRY MY LABRADOR.

2. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I BELIEVE OIL COMPANIES’  PROFITS OF 4% ON A GALLON OF GAS ARE OBSCENE BUT THE GOVERNMENT TAXING THE SAME GALLON OF GAS AT 15% ISN’T.

3. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I BELIEVE THE GOVERNMENT WILL DO A BETTER JOB OF SPENDING THE MONEY I EARN THAN I WOULD.

4. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE FREEDOM OF SPEECH IS FINE AS LONG AS I AGREE WITH WHAT IS SAID AND NOBODY ELSE IS OFFENDED BY IT.

5. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I’M WAY TOO IRRESPONSIBLE TO OWN A GUN AND I KNOW THAT MY LOCAL POLICE ARE ALL I NEED TO PROTECT ME FROM MURDERERS AND THIEVES.

6. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I BELIEVE THAT PEOPLE WHO CAN’T TELL US IF IT WILL RAIN ON FRIDAY CAN TELL US THAT THE POLAR ICE CAPS WILL MELT AWAY IN 10 YEARS IF I DON’T START DRIVING A PRIUS.

7. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I’M NOT CONCERNED ABOUT MILLIONS OF BABIES BEING ABORTED SO LONG AS WE KEEP ALL DEATH ROW INMATES ALIVE.

8. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I THINK ILLEGAL ALIENS HAVE A RIGHT TO FREE HEALTH CARE, EDUCATION, AND SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS, AND WE SHOULD TAKE AWAY THE SOCIAL SECURITY FROM THOSE WHO PAID INTO IT.

9. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I BELIEVE THAT BUSINESSES SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED TO MAKE PROFITS FOR THEMSELVES. THEY NEED TO BREAK EVEN AND GIVE THE REST AWAY TO THE GOVERNMENT FOR REDISTRIBUTION AS THE DEMOCRATS SEE FIT.

10. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I BELIEVE LIBERAL JUDGES NEED TO REWRITE THE CONSTITUTION EVERY FEW DAYS TO SUIT SOME FRINGE KOOKS WHO WOULD NEVER GET THEIR AGENDAS PAST THE VOTERS.

11. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE I THINK THAT IT’S BETTER TO PAY BILLIONS FOR THEIR OIL TO PEOPLE WHO HATE US BUT NOT DRILL OUR OWN BECAUSE IT MIGHT UPSET SOME ENDANGERED BEETLE, SPOTTED OWL, GOPHER OR FISH.

12. I VOTED DEMOCRATIC BECAUSE MY HEAD IS SO FIRMLY MISPLACED TOWARD THE SOUTH END OF MY BODY; IT’S UNLIKELY THAT I’LL EVER HAVE ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW.

NO TREES, SPOTTED OWLS, OR RED COCK-HEADED WOODPECKERS WERE HARMED IN THE SENDING OF THIS MESSAGE.

—JAMES W. ANDERSON

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Saturday, November 26, 2016

Fighting A Cold And Visiting Chinamart

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About a week ago, I worked outside for about a half-hour in the wind and ended up with a head-ache. It hung on for a week and wouldn’t respond to acetaminophen or ibuprofen, so I figured it was either turning into a sinus infection or a cold. Since I wasn’t really showing any obvious signs of a cold, the missus thought I was just being a hypochondriac, which is her usual thinking. However, the sneezing and snotting kicked in yesterday, so she finally realized that I wasn’t blowing smoke. I got some over-the-counter cold dope and the head-ache is gone and the sneezing and snotting is greatly reduced. Still, I spent so much time sneezing and blowing my nose last night that I didn’t fall asleep until sometime after 3am. Also, my sinuses were blocked badly enough that I couldn’t use my C-PAP machine. I doubt if I can tonight, either.

Yesterday, despite barely being able to walk anymore (because of pain in her hip), my wife decided that she wanted to go to the mall and take a round. We had just barely got into the beginning of gridlock when we remembered that it was “Black Friday.” (Remember when that meant the supposed day of the crucifixion?) We managed to drive around a block and change directions, so we headed for the Chinamart on the far side of town. It was busy, but bearable. The missus got about half what we needed before she got tired of the crowd and we went home.

While there, I cornered the store manager and thanked him for having the only store in the area that had a reasonable number of handicapped scooters. Most stores have only about half of what they need. Most stores are forgetting that we baby-boomers are hitting retirement age, and a lot of us aren’t in very good shape.

Today, we went to the Chinamart up next to the mall. Traffic was heavy, but not like yesterday. My wife picked up most of the stuff she hadn’t gotten yesterday, while I tried snoozing in the truck. They have a big Toys-For-Tots thing up there and some other things that may or may not be related. They have a fake steam train that they blow the “whistle” on every few minutes, and there were some elves and the Grinch dancing around to deafening music and hugging any little kid who would let them. Darth Vader and three of his “friends” were there, too, for some reason. I found it amusing that it was mostly adults who wanted their picture taken with the galactic goofball. You have to wonder if some folks ever grow up. (Incidentally, Word recognized “Darth Vader” with no problem, yet many common words of the English language get underlined—more proof that the system was set up by under-educated “kids.”

I watched the last 40 minutes of a Gaither musical/history program called “Circuit Rider,” a little while ago. One of my great-grandfathers started out as a circuit rider. I told my wife that if those old-time preachers could hear a lot of what passes for religious music these days, they’d probably think it was the work of the devil. They sort of got to rockin’ and a-rollin’ a couple times! Oh well, to each their own; we enjoyed MOST of the show.


I’m feeling tired, though it’s only 9pm. I may hit the hay soon, but that doesn’t mean that I’ll sleep. I guess if I don’t, I can always do like I did last night and study in Genesis a while. © 2016
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You Can Be Sure That New Radioactive Water Laws Are All About The Money (a link)

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https://thinkprogress.org/epa-proposed-new-emergency-limits-for-radioactive-drinking-water-and-they-dont-look-good-15ef69adf793#.jjvetmo97
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The Corruption Never Ends (links on new GMO law)

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This may not be news to those in the know, but it's just now getting out to a lot of us. The government has already allowed the terms "organic" and "natural" to become worthless, now the "labeling" for those who want to know what they're eating will be even more worthless than it is now, and that's BAD. People should have the right to make a choice,; they should NOT be denied the knowledge to make that choice. I won't pontificate on my own feelings on the subject of GMO's, but if they're so darn great, why do the manufacturers try so hard to hide the facts?

http://www.naturalnews.com/054856_GMO_labeling_President_Obama_Dark_Act_20.html

http://www.alternet.org/food/why-gmo-labeling-bill-obama-just-signed-law-sham-and-national-embarrassment

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/obama-signs-controversial-gmo-food-label-law-n620796

http://modernfarmer.com/2016/08/gmo-labeling-law/

http://www.truth-out.org/buzzflash/commentary/obama-signs-bill-that-prohibits-informative-gmo-labeling
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104 Years Ago Today

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Click images to enlarge.

...my grandma at Parkersburg, West Virginia, sent this card to my granddad, working at Odell, WV.


Also, his mother at Parkersburg, as well, sent granddad THIS card.


Furthermore, my granddad, who was at or passing through Charleston, West Virginia that day, mailed THIS card to my grandma at Parkersburg, WV.

Just for the record, I believe those are barn swallows, not bluebirds.
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106 Years Ago Today

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Click image to enlarge.

...my granddad at Pullman, West Virginia, sent this card to my grandma at Parkersburg, WV.
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107 Years Ago Today

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Click image to enlarge.

...my granddad at Salem, West Virginia, sent this to my grandma at Parkersburg, WV.
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Hey Shoppers! (a meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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Bureaucracy Versus Common Sense (a meme)

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Click image to enlarge.
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Soros Again (pic)

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Click image to enlarge.

This is said to be a photo of Gorges Soros, during his teenage Nazi collaborator days. He called those days "the best of my life."
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Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Log Chains For My Log Skidder (w/pics)

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Well what’d ya expect; I’m a po’ boy ya know!

Click images to enlarge.

I’m not sure that it was a good investment to sell my farm tractor to afford truck-driving school. However, I had no way to know that I’d develop heart problems and have to quit driving after less than a year-and-a-half. So, my tractor and equipment are gone. That leaves only my pick-up, my lawn tractor and a pair of weak legs to work with. I’ll make do, though.

My truck has a hitch tube, so if I want to pull a chain with it, I just insert a ball and make a loop in the chain. Those who’ve used trucks for such things know that more depends on traction than power, so a little extra weight in the back, good tread, four-wheel drive if you have it, and an easy touch on the gas pedal can achieve wonders.

As for my weak legs, they used to be strong legs, but bursitis in both hips has pretty-much confined them to moving light loads for short distances.

That leaves my lawn tractor for loads heavier than I want to bother with or, more often, distances that I can’t handle anymore. My lawn tractor is a twin cylinder, 20 horse Snapper, a far cry from the old 20 horse farm tractors that some companies used to put out. Weight and torque make a BIG difference in performance! Still, it has more power than I do, so I decided to put it to use.

The first thing I did was to measure the size of the little hole in the back rim of the tractor body which the company expects you to use for attaching toy trailers. Somehow, I just didn’t want to try pulling from a half-inch hole only a half inch from the edge of a thin piece of steel. Therefore, I got a ball that normally is used to pull the sulky on a Gravely walk-behind mower, and mounted it like a regular hitch, instead of upside-down, like on a Gravely. I used a couple fender washers under the hitch and a regular washer below two more fender washers UNDER the steel lip to help distribute pressure over a larger area. Then I rigged up a five foot length of ¼” chain with a grab-hook on one end and a 2” ring on the other. That was a few years ago, and the rig served me well.

Unfortunately, that little chain walked off and hid somewhere in the past year, so I’ve been using a much longer chain of the same link size that I once used as a binder chain, back when I actually worked in the woods. Since I’m going to start fiddling with cutting a little firewood and hope to get my chainsaw mill running this winter, I wanted to get a another short chain set up. Sadly, being a poor old codger, I was going to have to wait until next month to afford the chain I wanted.

As fate would have it, when poking around in the basement, I discovered 10’ of chain that I’d bought long ago for some long forgotten project. It was one size smaller than ¼”, but it looked like it would hold all that my humongous log skidder could pull, so I cut it in half.  I raided my change jar and found that I had enough to buy four ¼” S-hooks. Using the vice, I attached one to each end of the two 5’ chain lengths. I was planning to put a grab hook on one end of each chain, and a ring on the other. I didn’t find any grab hooks that small, though, and realizing that the S-hooks would stand the pressure and would hook INTO a link, rather than across one, I decided to save the money and just use the chains the way they were. Without putting the ring on the other end, I can shorten the chain length by making the loop around the ball larger. As you can see from the photos, the set-up works fine. © 2016
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Sunday, November 20, 2016

I Almost Didn’t Type This Up

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The missus and I had a very enjoyable time with “the kids” (my stepson and his wife) and our youngest granddaughter yesterday. They’re good kids and we love them dearly; unfortunately, they’re also a couple of third party voters. As many of you know, I’ve been rather vocal this election on folks throwing their votes away, so I was concerned about putting this out there, since they might think that it was done for them. It isn’t, but you KNOW that I can’t keep my mouth shut when something’s on my mind!

All across the country, there are hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of people who chose to waste their votes. I’ve said enough as to why I think that is, for the most part, so I won’t dissect that political corpse fully today. As I think about it, though, the only way that I can fathom a person squandering their precious vote on an obvious loser in a race between multiple candidates, is if they believe that the outcome is a foregone conclusion. I’m not saying that’s really the case, I’m just saying that’s the only conceivable reason THAT I CAN UNDERSTAND.

This election was such an obvious night and day situation that no-one could think otherwise without lying to themselves. Trump may not be very likable at times, but he is NOT deliberately and thoroughly evil like Hillary. Unfortunately, the last couple of generations have been turned into “touchy-feely” wimps by our socialist school system. As a result, they just didn’t “feel” that they could vote for Trump, since he wasn’t all warm and fuzzy.

Despite what some folks like to say, this election was NOT a landside, only the Electoral College, that system that prevents places like New York and California from running the whole country, made it LOOK that way due to the winner-take-all rules in most states. Let’s pretend for a minute that the election eventually came down to awaiting the voting results of ONE state. Perhaps, even a small one like West Virginia with its five little votes in the Electoral College. And let’s further pretend that the vote was so close here that Hillary had won by ONE vote, and so she won the election. Would those third party voters still feel so smug about their “feelings” and their righteousness, KNOWING that THEY were the ones responsible for electing the most vile, corrupt person to the presidency in the entire history of the United States?

THAT is the danger of throwing your vote away on predictable losers to spite someone else. EVERY election has the potential to be that close. YOUR individual vote might be the one that throws your state’s electoral votes to one candidate or the other. It is the nation’s very survival that can be at stake; it is the future of your children and grandchildren that is ALWAYS at stake. All-in-all, I see very little difference between the maturity of throwing away of a precious vote, that past generations have LITERALLY fought and died to give you, and the “snowflakes” with their coloring books in the “crying rooms” of America’s colleges. © 2016
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Saturday, November 19, 2016

Old Yeller…….PAINT!

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My maternal grandfather was a hard worker, but he was never very well off. Over the years, he’d worked in an ice plant and a shipyard and had spent the last couple decades of his working life as a drywall contractor. His favorite thing, though, was gardening, with farming a distance second, and he ALWAYS lived on a farm. Not being particularly well off, he well understood the wisdom of not buying cheap tools, though he occasionally made an error in judgment on the matter.

Naturally, when you invest the money in a good tool, you don’t want to “lose” it. Unfortunately, he and Grandma lived at the mouth of a small hollow, at the intersection of two country roads. There was a fair amount of traffic on those roads, and the access to the back of his barn was nearly impossible to keep an eye on. And of course, night has its “creepy crawlers,” who sneak around looking for things to “liberate.” As a result, Granddad had more than one tool over the years that grew legs and walked off. He scratched his head and tried to think of how he might protect things that he couldn’t see for hours at a stretch.

His answer was paint, and not just ANY paint, but canary yellow! For one thing, he figured that color would be easier to spot when working outdoors. That meant that he WOULD be less likely to actually lose a tool unless, of course, he happened to be working in an aspen or maple grove in autumn. Then, it wasn’t as perfect an idea as it first seemed. Also, something I noticed, when I went in his barn to get a tool, was that I was confronted with a great mass of yellow, where everything blended with everything. Finding tools there was harder than you’d imagine.

However, the idea DID seem to greatly reduce the tools that grew legs by miraculous evolution. For one thing, Granddad didn’t just paint them with a light coat that might be easily removed. He completely saturated those tools with the bright yellow paint. Some tools, like axes, saws and chisels didn’t even work as well as they should, since the paint wasn’t nearly as “slippery” as polished steel, and he painted right up to the cutting edge. He also soaked the joints between wood and steel to the point where it would take a monumental effort to clean the tool well enough for a midnight requisition worker to pass it off as his own tool, if he went to sell it. Not surprisingly, all the country neighbors for miles eventually noticed that his tools were all yellow. If one fell off his farm trailer and onto the county road, more than likely, a neighbor would see it and bring it to him. I guess I’d have to say that the idea worked for him.

Granddad has been gone for 21 years now. I have several of his tools in my basement, but I’ve used very few of them. The wrenches are so covered with multiple layers of paint that they often don’t fit the nuts they’re supposed to fit. Also, the lettering is covered and you have to guess the size to begin with. Jointed tools, like tin snips and pruners, often have so much paint on them that they simply refuse to work anymore. It’s always been simpler just to maintain my own tools, and even buy a new one if I must, than to remove all the paint and restore them to working condition.

Now that I’m retired, though, I have more time and less money, and that pile of yellow tools seems to be taunting me. Besides, in my old age, I much prefer hand tools to power tools, and a few of those tools are ones that I could put to use, IF they were “depainted” and restored. So, the other day, when I went to Rural King to get some naphtha, I instead got a heat gun that was on sale for the same price as a gallon of the solvent. Voila! I now have another project for this winter! At this rate, I can’t croak for several more winters, or I won’t get my work done. © 2016
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Friday, November 18, 2016

We ALMOST Had A Good Day

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It was a warm and beautiful day here today and, since there was a place several miles east of town that I wanted to go, I asked my wife if she’d like to take a ride. So, we headed east on the four-lane incarnation of the old Northwestern Pike until we came to the first loop of the old two-lane. We prefer the back roads when they’re available. We had a good time seeing the countryside and an occasional splotch of color on the otherwise leafless hills. It had been over a year since I’d been out that way driving dump truck. It may have been TWO years since I’d taken my wife out that way. There’s not much money for gas anymore, so we stay pretty close to home.

The missus wasn’t thrilled when I stopped at a gun shop to see if they carried a couple spouts for my black powder flasks. Unfortunately, they didn’t stock them. I guess I’ll have to order them online, since the local shop that used to stock them doesn’t seem to be open anymore.

Not two minutes after we left the shop, still heading east, the truck started acting like it had a tire out of balance or lose lug nuts. It came on so suddenly, that I pretty much ruled out the latter. I stopped and checked to see if a low tire was the problem, but they all looked normal. With my wife, everything is either perfect or unbearable; there’s never any middle ground. SO, instead of proceeding cautiously, nothing would do but that we end our trip several miles sooner than intended, turn around and flee homeward on the four-lane. I was pretty disgusted, but neither logic nor argument has any clout with her, so we came home.

The truck behaved perfectly the whole way back, so it may have just been a matter of traveling a rough stretch of road at just the wrong speed. I’ll double-check the lug nuts tomorrow, but if it acts up again, I’ll take my salsa red Toyota lemon to the tire shop Monday and have them check the balance on the tires. I guess one of the wheels could have thrown a weight, considering all the potholes we have around here.

I DID manage to salvage my own day slightly, by installing the tires on my sawmill frame and using the lawn tractor to pull it from the bench below the house to the backyard. Naturally, that didn’t please the missus, but I can work on it easier there and get it finished up. Having always been used to having a sawmill in the family until about 15 years ago, it really torques me to see lumber prices so high that I can’t even afford to buy stock for SMALL projects anymore. I plan on that changing soon.

The pooch and I had a good porch sit before it got dark, so the day ended pretty well for the two of us. Bad weather may soon be here, though. BAH! HUMBUG! © 2016
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